Motherhood needs a village to thrive. 
Mother Effect has a hub of organic networks and connections to support Mother Culture, these include:
- MENTORING
- RESOURCES FOR MOTHERS GROUPS
- ENCOURAGING TESTIMONY VIDEOS
- SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENCE
- SUPPORT LOCAL MUMS TO START MOTHERS GROUPS
- MOTHERS PRAYERS RESOURCE
- STUDY ACTION RESOURCES TO GROW MOTHERS
 

 

We lead circle time with the children. We choose songs that are easy to learn and use the repeated lyrics. At the end of the music time, we ask a "wonder questions" to encourage the children to respond. The children just love that they are there together with their mum, their faces beam with delight that they are singing and playing together.

We lead a time of clear proclamation of the Gospel. We are careful to use clear language and demonstration. We use miniature figurines to show the Gospel story. The children watch in awe. Because children like to use their whole bodies, we always sing a song with actions  in response. We then invite the children to hold the figures, to come and see the Gospel we have set up. They are invited to come and work with these materials with the help of their mum.

Parent information is with the activity to add value to the experience.

For Example

 

Posting boxes 9 months + or when sitting.

 

Have you ever played peekaboo with an infant or toddler? I love to hear that gurgle of laughter every time the person hiding appears. Why does this game appeal so much to young children? Adults know that when someone ducks out of view does, he has not disappeared forever, but for the young child, it truly is a case of “out of sight, out of mind.” When something is gone from sight, it no longer exists for the child.

This activity is introduced to children when they are old enough to sit up without assistance, generally around 8–12 months of age. The direct aim of the material is to help children develop their sense of object permanence. It also indirectly helps them develop focus and concentration and gives them practice developing fine motor skills through the whole-hand grasp.

When your child is finished help them to set it up for the next person. Observe your child and look for signs of concentration and peace on your child’s face.